Tag Archives: Tree Care Service Dickinson

Tree Experts Dickinson

Is it time to call a tree service in Dickinson to remove that old tree? It can be a painful choice to make, but sometimes the tree gets too close to the house, gets too diseased, gets an incurable infestation of some pest, or grows too tall and gets close to a power line. If any of these things occur, its best to do the right thing and get rid of the tree. Although you might have spent hours and hours getting the tree to where it is today, it is almost dishonorable to the tree to allow it to suffer in bad conditions.

Our tree removal service will plan it out, climb up the tree and tie two long ropes near the top. Anchor them on the opposite side of the one that we want it to fall towards. This will allow us to adjust the direction the tree is being lowered in, just in case it starts leaning towards anything it could destroy.

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Once the tree is down, stump removal can be slightly more difficult. We have several choices; use a stump chipper that will completely destroy the visible section of the stump. Or we can dig it out. Digging out the stump is much more thorough, but takes time. You can choose to do this yourself or have the family help. If you have kids this shouldn’t be a problem. Kids often find the thought of digging fun, and are excited to go outside and dig all day long with their friends.

Tree And Bush Trimming

Tree Removal: Know How Much This Service Costs

For those unsure what it costs to remove a tree, the overall size of the tree is a major factor in the cost of removal. Trees that grows enormous in length and width for instance pine and red oak is going to have a high removal cost. Many companies will charge differently, however, the cost will probably be $500 or somewhat higher. This cost shouldn't exceed $1000 for each tree. Medium sized trees are ones that will grow from 30-60 feet high such as black gum and Crabapple trees. The price of tree cutting will be around $200 and $400. With smaller trees i.e. those growing 30 feet and below, the removal fees are from $120.

There are numerous signs that you can check to determine that the tree trunk is decaying as well. If there's red dust along the bottom of the tree, it might be an indication that your tree is decaying. If your trunk is decaying, you will see bugs and mushrooms growing throughout the bottom of the tree. Insects and fungus will feed on dead and rotting matter and their presence is undoubtedly an indication that the tree has some dead matter. You may also inspect the trunk for any visible signs of decay. Dead tree bark, wounds and discolored areas are all negative signs of a rotting tree. Some could have significant cracks that you can actually see inside the trunk. Hollowed out trunks may be a clear sign that the trunk is bad so this normally requires the tree to get removed fast enough before it may cause any harm to your building. You will also see some weak trees that are connected to the floor by some weakened roots and should be removed soon enough.

If you want to remove trees and you just don't know how much it will cost you, you will need to have a rough estimate to ensure that you are not overcharged. Removal cost for a small tree is normally $8 each foot. Therefore if you want to remove a small tree that is 20 feet high, the estimated tree removal cost is $8 multiplied by 20. Therefore, the tree removal cost will be around $160. If you've got a medium tree whose height is 50 feet high, the cost of removal will probably be $9 multiplied by 50. Therefore, the price of removing this tree will probably be close to $450. If you have a big tree that's 90 feet tall, the estimated cost will be $10 multiplied by 90. This will provide you with a projected tree removal price of $900.

Choosing the right tree removal service is important to make certain you as well as your property are well protected. Therefore, you need to ensure that you make a good choice of the tree removal service. You'll want to go for a respected company to begin this work. To find a reputable company, you could get referrals through friends that has used this kind of service before. You can even check from the internet to what other folks have to say about different tree removal companies. Even though it is very important to think about cost, the main key to consider will be the quality of service first. You will need to ensure that the tree removal service you opt for is fully registered and has taken the appropriate insurance policy. Deciding on a good company will assure that your odds of any damages for the duration of tree removal are reduced.

 

Call Us Now for a Free Quote on Tree Removal, Tree Topping, Tree Pruning and Stump Removal in Dickinson.

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Tree Trimming Estimates

Tree Trunk Removal Doesn't Have to Be a Headache

Tree pruning and trimming services have been considered synonymous but for the experts who know the real deal, pruning is not the same as trimming. Both terms have different processes and systems. But the system used is different from each service.

When one talks about tree trimming, it is like tree maintenance or tree grooming. Trimming the tree focuses on the outer appearance only. The tree owner is concerned about shaping the tree to make it look nice - take out new growth, trimming off awkward branches and forming the leaves or branches accordingly to style.

Tree pruning, on the other hand, is more of salvaging the health condition of the tree. Pruning is necessary for sick trees. With this system, the specialists have to remove a dead branch or infected tree limbs to save the life of the tree and protect the people around it. This is the main difference between tree pruning and trimming services.

3. Tree pruning and trimming services are best done during the winter season because it is easier to see which branches needs to be pruned. So, the time is now. Experts will not do it when the temperature is at freezing point though. This will make the trees brittle and thus easy to get shattered - can endanger people around it.

These are just some of the tips gathered from professionals. Remember that tree pruning and trimming services are not a do it yourself project. You have to contact the right people to do the work.

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Tree Removal In My Area

Why Prune a Tree, Especially in the Winter?

Thought this article might be interesting about what all is involved in preparing for a tree service job.

I have been running a tree service company for 10 years in Bellingham WA.

The first duty being asked about is the rope and saddle. I use the Buckingham Economy Saddle. On the right side of the saddle I have a Petzl Macrograbber for flipline adjusting. It is secured to the Buckingham saddle with a 5/8ths galvanized shackle.

Also on the right side of the Buckingham saddle I have a three foot lanyard with an autolocking steel clip hard spliced into the end to secure the chainsaw.

On the left side of the Buckingham saddle, I clip a lowering rope and a repelling rope onto the lightweight ring toward the back of the saddle. I use a locking Petzl William Carabiner Tri-Act Gate for the repelling rope.

I am constantly on the look-out for frayed or damaged spots on the repelling rope. I prefer a thicker repelling rope. The ½ Arbor-Plex works well.

The lowering rope I use is determined by the application. Most of the work I do is close quarters and requires lowering of branches and rounds. The lowering ropes vary in length from 150' to 300'.

On the left side of the Buckingham there is a small clip. I carry a Fanno 22" Hand saw. This is used for pruning small branches as I ascend and also as a catch device on situations where I need that extra reach to grab the flipline whipped around the tree.

Other devices on the Buckingham include:

Standard figure 8 for repelling and potential maneuvers while in the tree.

I like to carry a 10' rope flipline with a Prusik hitch. This allows for extra stabilizing before making cuts. It also allows for quick attachment as I ascend through branches, keeping me tied in at all times.

On the left side small ring I have attached a small line that has a wedge secured on it.

The next duty asked to describe on the application is the lift truck operation.

I have owned a 1963 55' Ford High Ranger for four years. First I check all fluids. Brake, oil, transmission, and radiator. As well as the hydraulic tank reservoir. Then I start the engine and do a visual inspection of the engine. I do a visual inspection on the tires and check all the lights for proper working order.

Then I engage the main hydraulic level in the cab and begin to inspect for any broken or damaged hydraulic lines. I lower the outriggers to insure smooth operation. I operate the boom from a manual position on the deck, and then climb into the bucket to test the working order of the bucket hydraulic controls.

I follow all guidelines outlined in the American National Standards manual for Arboricultural Operation/ ANSI Z133.1 Section Aerial Devices. Briefly explained:

I am aware of:

Load capacities of the boom, I set wheel chocks if the wheels are on the ground after lowering the outriggers, I constantly scan in the direction I am travelling, I set up for proper traffic clearances, I maintain proper distance for electrical lines, lift branches off lines with pull ropes before cutting, insure area below before releasing branches to the ground, and constantly monitor for any potential danger.

I operated at this level with the High Ranger for two years. 90% of the tree removals that I do I have to climb. I decided that for me and my business the cost of maintaining the truck was not necessary. I use the bucket truck on my personal property but do not currently use it for my tree service.

Operation of brush chippers:

I have thousands of hours of brush chipping experience. The key to efficient chipping is proper staging of the branches. Cedars are the most difficult. On branches that have multiple smaller branches coming off of the main branch I trim them off. It's easier not to fight the branches when stacking and then feeding into the chipper.

Even when pulling the tree over with bull rope, as soon as the back cut is deep enough I will place my first wedge and hammer it in with a small sledge hammer. This helps to get the tree moving in the desired direction, prevents set back if the rope becomes slack, and helps to keep the chain for binding.

The are many techniques for felling trees. The basic is a face cut, no more than a third way through the tree. When cutting for money I use a humbolt cut, but they take a little more time to do and are not necessary for fire wood applications, so I'll use a conventional face cut on most. As your finishing the depth of the face cut you want to check the gun. There is a small raised mark on chainsaws that allow you to aim the face cut to the desired fall line. With that mark lined up and a straight back cut the tree will grab hold of the hinge wood and cause the tree to follow the desired fall line. There are so many factors involved, and each tree is different.

Proper limbing techniques are important to know for both safety reasons and from keeping the saw from getting pinched. You can lead the branch in the direction you desire by following the same procedure as felling a tree. If you need the branch to drop parallel to the ground you place a cut under the branch and then at full speed place the saw above that cut and go hard. The branch will snap and float down. One way to get the branch to land at the base of the tree is to cut from the top and let the branch break swing down but still be attached. Then make removing cut to send it right next to the tree.

When limbing on the ground you want to be aware of the branch and if there is any tension that would cause it to pop and sling back when you cut it off. I like to start at the top before cutting the main pieces to the ground. I'll go about 10, good size for the chipper and start cutting the limbs off from there. Working my way every 10' till all the branches are off the top.

Bucking large wood is easy if you use a wedge. A peavey or cant hook is used to turn larger logs over. I cut down as far as possible before rolling. Work on the upside of the log. When dropping the last 20' I like to put small long branches in front of the stump coming off. This keeps it off the ground and makes cutting the larger diameter trunks easier. I do the same as I drop major branches onto the ground if possible. Use the dogs to dig into the tree. It's safer than having the chain operation by your feet and cuts into the wood faster.

I subscribe to Arborage, it's a monthly magazine about the tree industry. It talks about the latest equipment and some tree care issues. I use my Western Garden book if there is a particular fruit tree that I need better understanding of how to prune. I do still look over The Fundamentals of General Tree Work. Now with the advent of YouTube, I invest time looking at other peoples techniques to see what I may learn.

Learning for me never stops.

Tim Bento

Call Us Now for a Free Quote on Tree Removal, Tree Topping, Tree Pruning and Stump Removal.

Call Now (832) 900-4016


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Tree Experts Dickinson

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Kanshoh Trees
5161 San Felipe Street Ste 320, Houston, Texas, 77056

Call Us: (832) 900-4016
http://www.kanshohtrees.com/

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